A fire destroyed the House Busteed, built in 1800, on the Gaspé peninsula

Un feu détruit la Maison Busteed, bâtie en 1800, en Gaspésie

Un feu détruit la Maison Busteed, bâtie en 1800, en Gaspésie

The House Busteed, Pointe-à-la-Croix in the Gaspé. Built in 1800 by Thomas Busteed, was completely destroyed by a fire.

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June 1, 2020 14: 00

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A fire destroyed the House Busteed, built in 1800, on the Gaspé peninsula

Un feu détruit la Maison Busteed, bâtie en 1800, en Gaspésie

Un feu détruit la Maison Busteed, bâtie en 1800, en Gaspésie

Gilles Gagné

The Sun

POINTE-À-LA-CROIX – A fire has completely destroyed Sunday night the House Busteed, Pointe-à-la-Croix in the Gaspé. Built in 1800 by Thomas Busteed, he was one of the oldest residences in the region. Uninhabited since 2009, she belonged since 2011 to the band council of the community’s mi’gmaq of Listuguj.

The alert was given to 21: 40, but the firemen of Listuguj and Pointe-à-la-Croix have only been able to control flare ups widespread. An investigation is underway as a first attempt to put the fire had occurred there a little over a week.

“You could see black marks on the wall when I went there a week,” laments Michel Goudreau, of the Société historique Machault, which ensures the protection of the heritage in this sector. He qualifies as a “great loss to the Gaspé peninsula” the disappearance of the house.

The mayor of Pointe-à-la-Croix, Pascal Bujold has responded on social media by writing ” do not…The oldest house in the Gaspé is on fire! What a sad new…But that so…Why have you done this! It hurts and it will hurt for a long time….”

Un feu détruit la Maison Busteed, bâtie en 1800, en Gaspésie

Scarce, the family Busteed had lived in the home for 209 years, during six generations.

Special Collaboration, Gilles Gagné

Scarce, the family Busteed had lived in the home for 209 years, during six generations. The land located to the north of the house were at the heart of a dispute with the aboriginal band council at the end of the 1990s.

In march 2009, public Works Canada has acquired the house and land, covering a 1.6 square kilometre for a sum of approximately $ 800,000, to hand over the property two years later at the council of the band. Even before this transfer, the state had begun to deteriorate.

The Mi gmaqs remained divided on the vocation to give the remains. Some people wanted to turn it into a healing center, others wanted to give him a value as a tourist attraction, while other people saw in it a symbol of british colonialism.

Le Soleil

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