CHSLD: the army could be called to testify

CHSLD: l'armée pourrait être appelée à témoigner

CHSLD: l'armée pourrait être appelée à témoigner

In April and may, hundreds of military personnel have been deployed in approximately 25 nursing homes hard hit by the COVID-19, in Ontario and Quebec.

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June 7, 2020 15h29

Updated at 17h34

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CHSLD: the army could be called to testify

The canadian Press

OTTAWA — members of the canadian armed Forces working in care homes long-term care could give evidence in the proceedings against the institutions.

In April and may, hundreds of military personnel have been deployed in approximately 25 nursing homes hard hit by the COVID-19, in Ontario and Quebec.

The military reports overwhelming indicate that the troops have found abuse and neglect in homes, including insect infestations, aggressive nutrition of the residents (up to choking), bleeding, and residents who have cried for hours, asking for help.

Stephen Burman and Lucy Jackson, of the law firm Thomson Rogers, to lead a proposed class action of a $ 20 million lawsuit filed against Altamonte Care Community, on behalf of the residents of the centre residents and their families.

They say that the comments of the troops could be essential to prove the claims. They intend to try to collect the declarations of the members of the service, in the framework of the action.

“The military is able to provide evidence very useful, said Mr. Burman. They are entered as a third party, as objective observers. They have seen and identified a situation as horrible and shocking that may not have ever been revealed at this point, without their participation.”

The report on the center Altamonte includes allegations that most of the residents have not had their medications and were not fed properly.

You can also read a lot of them have been left in bed for long periods of time, without having been displaced or washed away.

The shortage of staff and training raised concerns.

Last week, there were more than 1,000 military members in 15 institutions of long-term care in Quebec, and nearly 500 in five homes in Ontario.

In Quebec, the army could stay in place until September, in the institutions of long-term care. Discussions are underway between Ottawa and the provincial government.

In Ontario, officials have confirmed on Sunday that the operations at Orchard Villa in Pickering, had come to an end. The military seemed ready to move on to another centre in Vaughan, north of Toronto.

“We can confirm that the CAF are in Woodbridge Vista for an evaluation, said Gillian Sloggett, a spokesman for the minister of long-term Care of Ontario, Merrilee Fullerton. We are thankful for the ongoing support of FAC and we will have more details in the coming days.”

The department of national Defence says that the military have the obligation to share their observations during the whole mission.

The department also recognizes that the army may be called to testify in court proceedings.

Le Soleil

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