COVID-19: researchers want to know how is your sleep

COVID-19: des chercheurs veulent savoir comment se porte votre sommeil

COVID-19: des chercheurs veulent savoir comment se porte votre sommeil

In Italy, a study has already given an overview of the nights troubled by the pandemic.

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May 26, 2020 4: 00

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COVID-19: researchers want to know how is your sleep

COVID-19: des chercheurs veulent savoir comment se porte votre sommeil

COVID-19: des chercheurs veulent savoir comment se porte votre sommeil

Marc Allard

The Sun

How is your sleep during the pandemic of COVID-19? Researchers from a dozen countries in the world — including a professor from the University Laval — want to know it.

The scientists began on Monday to seek participants for this international study will assess the impact of the pandemic and of the confinement on the sleep habits and mental health.

“It’s been three weeks that we had conference calls Zoom, and say : “we must do something”, because all the world is challenged by sleep problems,” says Charles Morin, a professor in the School of psychology of Laval University, who pilot the canadian/québécois de la recherche.

As recently reported in The Sun, several signs show that the crisis of the COVID-19 has already affected the sleep of Quebec. Mr. Morin and his colleagues seek to document the magnitude of this disturbance and to identify its manifestations at the international level.

“Our questions are formulated to ask people to be back in the peak of the pandemic,” says Charles Morin.

Scientists are in search of 1000 people aged over 18 years, with or without difficulty of sleep, to complete a questionnaire of approximately 40 questions and should take approximately 20 minutes.

In addition to the researchers of Canada, colleagues from Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, China, Japan, Germany, and Austria working on the research.

In Italy, a study has already given an overview of the nights troubled by the pandemic. At the end of march, the Italian researchers have probed their compatriots on the quality of their sleep during the confinement.

In particular, they have noticed that the people slept and woke up later. They spent also more time in bed, but, paradoxically, they slept less well.

The increase in sleep difficulties was stronger for individuals with a higher level of depression, anxiety and stress.

The international study is helping Charles Morin will document more precisely the difficulties of sleep and to compare the results of the ten countries surveyed.

The anonymous questionnaire is already online and will be available for about three weeks. Charles Morin hopes that there will be the most respondents possible. “If it was 2000, we will take them all!” he said.

The questionnaire is available here

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