Crushing Havre St-Pierre: rules to be reviewed according to the TSB

Écrasement à Havre St-Pierre: des règles à revoir selon le BST

Écrasement à Havre St-Pierre: des règles à revoir selon le BST

The Beechcraft King Air 100 Strait Air after its release at the end of the runway of the airport of Havre-Saint-Pierre, in Côte-Nord, in February 2018. Photo BST

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May 21, 2020 15h20

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Crushing Havre St-Pierre: rules to be reviewed according to the TSB

Écrasement à Havre St-Pierre: des règles à revoir selon le BST

Écrasement à Havre St-Pierre: des règles à revoir selon le BST

Steeve Paradis

The Sun

For the Office of the transportation safety board (TSB) of Canada, there was room for in-depth revision of the rules relating to the approach to the instruments of an aircraft in Canada, “because the rules are too complex, confusing and inefficient to prevent the pilot to perform an approach which is not permitted or prohibited.”

The agency made public Thursday its report of the investigation on an output end of the runway with a Beechcraft King Air 100 the company Strait Air at the airport of Havre-Saint-Pierre, in February 2018.

Because of the snow that was falling and a flawed analysis of the pilot, who “believed mistakenly that he was permitted to make the approach”, the aircraft landed too far on the runway and could not stop his stroke before coming to rest in a snow bank, to more than 200 feet from the end of the runway. Four of the eight occupants, six passengers and two crew members were slightly injured.

Two recommendations to Transport Canada emanate from this report. In his first, the TSB asked Transport Canada to review and simplify the operating minima for approaches and landings to airfields canadians. In his second, the Office recommends the introduction of a mechanism “to stop approaches and landings, which are in fact banned.”

A systemic problem

“This accident, which was fortunately fact that injured miners, is a good example of a systemic problem, which became evident during the investigation”, has launched an investigator assigned to the folder, Pierre Gavillet.

According to the latter, over the years, the rules concerning the approaches in Canada “have undergone adjustments, which have complicated the thing”. In contrast to what is happening mostly elsewhere in the world, you will find certain exceptions to the prohibitions of approach in the country. The driver believed to be able to take advantage of one of these exceptions, but this was not the case.

“The more simple it is to make as many other countries and take the minimum of visibility marked on the approach chart of the airport and setting the legal limit. If it says ¾ of a mile of visibility on the map, it is ¾ of a mile limit”, to launch Mr. Gavillet, which has landed on several airports on the planet. “But to get there, this is not a simple one. There is a lot of work on the part of Transport Canada to do that.”

At the airport of Havre-Saint-Pierre, the card approach evokes a visibility of ¾ – mile for light snow. En route, the crew received an update, stating that the visibility was at the time of ¼ of a mile. The pilot believed, however, able to continue his approach safely because he had a visual contact with the runway, one of the exceptions currently allowed.

As to the recommendation to stop the approaches and landings are prohibited, the investigator of the Office of transportation safety, estimated that, once the first recommendation is completed, it will be easier to observe.

Le Soleil

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