From Rome to Moscow, Europe is a leap to normality

De Rome à Moscou, l’Europe fait un bond vers la normalité

De Rome à Moscou, l’Europe fait un bond vers la normalité

Access to the emblematic monument of the ancient Rome in the heart of the eternal city is subject to hard rules: masks and take the temperature of visitors and staff, course, secure reservations and schedules modified to avoid the crowds at peak hours.

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June 1, 2020 9h21

Updated at 20h41

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From Rome to Moscow, Europe is a leap to normality

Fulya Ozerkan

Agence France-Presse

Sam Kingsley

Agence France-Presse

Romain Colas

Agence France-Presse

MOSCOW — the reopening Of the Colosseum in Rome to the shops in Moscow, Europe accelerates Monday its back to a semblance of normalcy in the face of the pandemic of novel coronavirus continues, however, to wreak havoc in Latin America.

Despite a recent rebound in the number of new cases daily, the Russian capital will alleviate the shackles of the restrictions by allowing its trade of non-food to re-open after more than two months of closure, and its inhabitants to walk in, provided you wear a mask and comply with a complex system of slots.

“The money will start to flow,” congratulated Olga, a saleswoman of a shop of handbags and jewelry, happy to see some customers come back.

Even if travel from one country to the other often remain impossible, of famous touristic places are open again to the public in Europe : the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul with its over 3000 shops and 30 000 merchants, and the Colosseum in Rome lit up for the occasion in the colors of italy.

Reopening the most visited site in the country after several other places and famous monuments, Italy hopes to raise more quickly the key sector of tourism, which has been undermined by the pandemic COVID-19, which has claimed more than 33, 000 deaths in the peninsula.

Access to the emblematic monument of the ancient Rome in the heart of the eternal city is, however, subject to hard rules : masks and take the temperature of visitors and staff, course, secure reservations and schedules modified to avoid the crowds at peak hours.

In England, schools closed since mid-march to welcome the new children 4 to 6 years, and from 10 to 11 years, to the chagrin of teachers ‘ unions and local communities, who consider the measure to be premature.

“We can’t really promise the parents that their babies will stay two meters away from each other all the time,” admitted Bryony Baynes, director of a primary school in Worcester (west of England).

A member of a government accused of having been slow to act, the minister of Education, Gavin Williamson, pointed out in the press the “need of going forward”.

More than 370 000 people dead

In the United Kingdom, countries of Europe, the more grief-stricken by the pandemic, with more than 38 000 people dead, the raising of six people are now allowed and the the most fragile people, forced to isolate themselves totally, can get out safely.

Some businesses like car dealers or the markets can resume their activity.

In the world, the balance sheet has crossed the mark of 370 000 victims for more than 6.1 million cases, according to a tally conducted by the AFP from official sources Sunday at 19h GMT. The numbers probably grossly under-valued.

Despite fears of a second wave, a scent of standardization fleet in Finland (restaurants, libraries and other public places), Greece (nursery and primary schools), Romania (cafes, restaurants, beaches), or even in Albania, Norway, Spain, and Portugal.

“I hope that there will be very few people, because this is all very new!”, told AFP the producer and distributor Pedro Borges, who operates the cinema Ideal, Lisbon, authorized as its competitors to re-open its doors.

As for the French, they eagerly await the reopening of cafés and restaurants Tuesday, and the lifting of the travel ban to more than 100 miles from home.

In other latitudes, the North Korea, according to media reports in south korea, will also reopen its schools, two months after it was closed as a precautionary measure. Pyongyang has not reported any case of COVID-19, leaving the experts doubtful of even that the virus was born in the neighbouring China, has spread to all continents.

Violence

Table a lot more dark in contrast in Latin America, which has become the epicenter of the pandemic, which was officially contaminated more than a million people.

In Brazil, by far the most affected country in the region with more than 500 000 new cases and nearly 30,000 deaths, the epidemic is accompanied by a rise in political tension on how to deal with it.

Clashes erupted Sunday night in Sao Paulo between supporters and opponents of the president Jair Bolsonaro. The head of State of the far-right minimizes the severity of the epidemic, is opposed to the measures of confinement ordered by the various local authorities and even took a walkabout on Sunday in Brasilia, defying the rules of distancing physical advocated to curb the contagion.

He also called for a resumption of the football championships. “As footballers are young and sports, the risk of death if they catch the virus is infinitely reduced”, he said.

His call was not welcomed. The sports director of the São Paulo FC and former idol of the Paris SG, Rai, called on him to resign.

In São Paulo, several hundred people fought in the street, despite the intervention of the police who fired tear gas, during clashes between a demonstration “against fascism” and a gathering of the president’s supporters came to protest against the measures of containment.

In the United States, where the balance sheet of the epidemic is the highest in the world (104 356 deaths recorded Sunday), the health crisis is also aggravated by deep political divisions and, for the past week, an outbreak of anger after the death of a black man during his arrest by a white policeman in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Elsewhere on the american continent, the pandemic continues to wreak havoc in Mexico, where the balance sheet approach of the 10 000 dead, and in Peru, where it threatens the hospitals collapse.

The economic damage that it has caused have pushed Chile and Peru and to apply for lines of credit to the international monetary Fund for a total of almost US $35 billion.

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