Lewis Hamilton believes Formula 1 fans would leave a big empty space

Lewis Hamilton croit que la Formule 1 sans fans laisserait un grand vide

Lewis Hamilton croit que la Formule 1 sans fans laisserait un grand vide

Lewis Hamilton feels that a “great void” if it had to compete for the Grand Prize in closed session.

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May 9, 2020 15h24

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Lewis Hamilton believes Formula 1 fans would leave a big empty space

Jerome Pugmire

Associated Press

PARIS — Driving a car on the tracks of Formula 1 in the absence of fans for cheering the drivers on the circuits of Silverstone and Monza would leave the reigning champion Lewis Hamilton faced a “great void”.

The first ten races of the schedule, including Montreal, have been either postponed or cancelled in the wake of the pandemic of sars coronavirus. The prestigious Monaco Grand Prix, has not been spared and will not take place for the first time in 66 years.

The leaders of the F1 remain hopeful to begin the season at the beginning of July with a double in Austria, and that 15 to 18 of the 22 races on the calendar can be completed.

But each of them would take place in front of the bleachers deserts until it is safe to accommodate them.

“It will be very empty,” said the Briton on Saturday, referring to the atmosphere of restrained trials of pre-season in Spain.

“For us, it’s going to be like a day of tests, probably even worse than a day of testing in a sense, has added the driver Mercedes. During a day of testing, there is not a lot of people in Barcelona, but there are still a few.”

However, the holding of races in any form would bring a sense of stimulation that would be well-received by the people during the confinement.

“I get messages from people around the world who live difficult moments during the current period because they do not have the chance to watch the sport,” said Hamilton in a video posted online by Mercedes.

“It’s just to demonstrate how sport is important in the lives of the people. It brings us together and it is so exciting and captivating. I don’t know at what point this will be exciting for the people watching on tv, but this will be better than nothing. ”


Lewis Hamilton

Hamilton was congratulated in doubt, publicly, the merits of presenting the Australian Grand Prix as planned, on 15 march. Possibly, the inaugural race of the calendar has been canceled, but only two days before the holding of the event, while spectators were still queuing up to buy tickets.

Hamilton took advantage of the first official press conference with the drivers of the F1 to say that he was flabbergasted to see that the organizers had to hold the race, which attracts more than 300,000 people for four days.

Leaders McLaren have announced their withdrawal before the race was cancelled, after a member of the team had undergone a positive test result for coronavirus. Representatives of Mercedes have written to the FIA and the F1 and requested that the race be cancelled. They had begun preparations for leaving the site before the decision is announced.

All the experience in Melbourne has turned into a great ride of uncertainty.

“It was a real shock to the system. Obviously, this Thursday, I shared my opinion on the relevance of being there or not,” said Hamilton.

“And then, waking up the next day, honestly, excited at the idea of me sitting in the car and to learn, then, that we will not go on the track, it was very, very surreal.”

Hamilton made his debut in F1 in 2007. He won his first title the following year with McLaren before adding five with Mercedes. All these years have been a whirlwind of flights international and Hamilton has won 84 of the 250 races in which he took part.

“I don’t remember a period where I spent six weeks in the same place. It is very, very unusual when we know that we are always on the road. It took getting used to,” noted Hamilton.

In the Face of all this uncertainty, Hamilton is able to maintain his weight.

He has possibly presented to the tests of pre-season, in February, in the best physical condition of his career, despite the fact that he is over the age of 35 years, Hamilton has remained in top form.

“I think my weight has probably stayed the same. When you have time like that, you can focus on certain things, weak points, things painful as the muscles of the calf,” said Hamilton.

“There are strengths and weaknesses everywhere on our body. When you go to the gym, often you’re working on the big muscles, but not necessarily small.”

Le Soleil

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