Shop clothes will not be the same any more in the post-crisis

Magasiner des vêtements ne sera plus pareil dans l'après-crise

Magasiner des vêtements ne sera plus pareil dans l'après-crise

Shop clothes will not be the same any more now, according to experts.

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May 20, 2020 18h34

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Shop clothes will not be the same any more in the post-crisis

Melissa Couto

The Canadian Press

It wasn’t so long – three months, in fact -, to buy her clothes was a relatively simple: you walk into a store, try a few items, we take what we like and leave the rest to the cashier. That was before the SARS-CoV-2.

While retail stores are starting to reopen their doors to the country, some additional steps will be added to the”customer experience”. Get in the queue before entering the store, if spraying hand sanitizer once inside and follow the markers of distancing physics are now commonplace to ensure the safety of clients and staff.

But experts say that there is always a risk of the new coronavirus during her shopping. “If a lot of people are manipulating the articles – and this will be the case, then yes: it could be a problem,” admits Satinder Kaur Brar, an expert in environmental biotechnology and in decontamination at York University, Toronto.

Diane Brisebois, CEO of the canadian Council of the retail trade, says that the stores that do double duty on the training of their personnel to disinfect the sensitive areas, such as the terminals of the fund, after the passage of each client, as well as a “sanitation strict and regular” surfaces in the store.

Yes, but what about the clothes themselves? Contact with clothing can be classified into two types, ” explains Colin Furness, an epidemiologist at the University of Toronto: the navigation relaxed, during the search of his size, and the more intimate contact, during the fitting.

Because the virus does not live as long on soft materials or porous only on hard surfaces, the professor Furness admits that the clothes are generally safer. But if we touch each hanger traversing the rays, we can manipulate the zippers or the buttons, trying a article, so here it is another pair of sleeves.

“On the zipper and the buttons, you can expect the virus to survive for more than a day,” said Mr Furness.

Magasiner des vêtements ne sera plus pareil dans l'après-crise

Get in the queue before entering the store, if spraying hand sanitizer once inside and follow the markers of distancing physical will be commonplace.

AFP Chandan Khanna

Most retailers allow their customers to try on clothes, though, to Roots, for example, does not. According to Ms. Brisebois, the ability of the fitting rooms will be reduced by half to ensure a separation physical in this corner of the store.

The cleaning of the changing rooms is also of great importance. “The employees will disinfect the cabin after each guest”, says Ms. Brisebois. The stores will also “quarantine” the clothes that have been tried, or give them a quick steam before putting them back in the store.

Here’s what the experts think some of these security measures promised by the stores:

The quarantine

Most stores in Canada want to quarantine their clothing for 24 to 72 hours. Mr. Furness is estimated that a period of a day constitutes a “reasonable precaution”.

Professor Brar, it, favours the precautionary principle, because we do not know how long the virus can survive on different types of fabrics. A quarantine of one day, it may be sufficient for the cotton, but not necessarily for the synthetic fabrics. “I suppose a week would be adequate – five days”, she suggested.

The steam blow

Ms. Brar believes that this would be something “effective” because viruses aren’t a fan of the humidity.

Mr. Furness is okay, but it reminds us that we do not know at what temperature and for how long it should be done before the virus is disabled. But he qualified this killing of”pretty impressive”.

“I would have liked to have a little bit more research to confirm ( … ), but in theory, I would say that it should be lethally effective.”

The gloves

The experts agree that ask employees or clients to wear gloves when shopping, would not be very effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Professor Brar recalls that the gloves may actually carry the virus on other surfaces, in particular when they are used for long periods of time.

Mr. Furness thinks that the gloves are problematic, because they cannot be disinfected. By contrast, the hands, they may be: he would prefer in fact that people wash their hands regularly.

Articles less accessible

According to Ms. Brisebois, the majority of traders move items behind the counter or in a display plexiglas: employees will be able to provide customers with the items they want to see it more closely, then disinfect afterwards.

The counters of makeup change, too, ” says Ms. Brisebois: the stores put up a video technology in order to replace the samples that would normally be used by customers to try a product.

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