Telecommuting: following the pandemic of the COVID-19, we continue or not?

Le télétravail: après la pandémie de la COVID-19, on continue ou pas?

Le télétravail: après la pandémie de la COVID-19, on continue ou pas?

The researcher Tania Saba, professor, School of industrial relations of the Université de Montréal and a researcher at CERIUM, became interested in this unique phenomenon: after the sudden stop of activities due to the pandemic of Covid-19, millions of people have found to work from home.

Share

8 may 2020 10: 00

Share

Telecommuting: following the pandemic of the COVID-19, we continue or not?

Stéphanie Marin

The Canadian Press

MONTREAL — The issue divides the workers. It continues or not telework after the pandemic? According to a study conducted by a researcher from the University of Montreal (UdeM), 39% of respondents wish to continue, against 37 % who were in a hurry to return to the office.

This question is in the head of many workers, several of which are experimenting for the first time teleworking — with its small pleasures and its irritating.

The researcher Tania Saba, professor, School of industrial relations of the université de montréal and a researcher at CERIUM, immediately interested in this unique phenomenon: all of a sudden, millions of people have found to work from home.

She has surveyed workers, primarily in Quebec but also in Canada, in a first phase of its study.

Ms. Saba has drawn strong interesting findings of a preliminary analysis of his data, obtained from 1614 participants, respondents 4 to 17 April.

First, if nearly 4 in 10 (39 %) are willing or very willing to continue to perform their work at home when the containment will be lifted, they are however almost as many (37%) to be somewhat or very likely to maintain the telework when they can return to the office. A total of 24% of the respondents are still undecided.

Those who are more willing to telecommute after the containment tend to be older, noted the researcher, as Chair of the BMO in diversity and governance of the université de montréal.

And as many men as women want to continue teleworking after the end of the containment measures, she noted.

The data indicate that one-third of the respondents in telecommuting believe their productivity has increased — even if they are working in their sitting-room, where another teleworker is located.

The people who are more productive are, in general, older than 40 years, and must devote less time to family obligations. No significant difference between men and women.

This, in fact, that Ms. Saba that “telework continues to be considered as a good avenue to balance their work and personal lives, whether we are a man or a woman: it is therefore false to believe that telework more interested in the women than the men!”

Certain conditions led to the increase of the productivity, she notes: to be well-equipped to work remotely and be adept with the technology, or at the very least, be well-disposed towards it.

His research is still in progress.

With his colleague of the Chair in diversity and governance, Gaëlle Cachat-Rosset, Ms. Saba continues to collect the results, because she wants to see if the views of workers on telework will remain a member of the time, or if those who enjoy it will eventually get tired of it.

The study has been developed in collaboration with researchers from the Université Laval, Toulouse Business School, France.

Moreover, the professor will have very soon the results of the study carried out in France, and will compare its data from quebec and canada.

Le Soleil

Share Button

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *