The long queues are growing for products that are not essential

Les longues files d'attente se multiplient pour des produits non essentiels

Les longues files d'attente se multiplient pour des produits non essentiels

In Edmonton, Alberta, many people make the file in a new branch of the chain fast food restaurant Peters ‘ Drive-In.

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May 17 2020 14: 52

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The long queues are growing for products that are not essential

Donna Spencer

The Canadian Press

The long queues to get into the grocery stores and big-box stores have been one of the outstanding phenomena of the beginning of the crisis COVID-19.

Since then, another type of queue has seen the light of day — and this is not to make reserves of toilet paper.

Motorists who follow the queue leu leu to get doughnuts or ice cream at the service of the auto have recently impeded the circulation at various locations in Canada.

In Edmonton, Alberta, Rob Ladouceur and his wife have tried their luck, without success, for three consecutive days in a new branch of the chain fast food restaurant Peters ‘ Drive-In.

Took a craving for burgers, fries and shakes at the milk, the couple returned home empty-handed for the first time, when the queue of cars stretched nearly a kilometre. They have been turned away at two other times because the restaurant has had to close its doors for the day before their car reaches the window of the drive-through service.

The new branch has contributed to its appeal, but Mr. Ladouceur is estimated that the pandemic is also something. Guests are not allowed to enter the restaurant, the service at the wheel was their only option. Mr. Ladouceur explains that he was seeking an occasion that is entertaining to get out of the house. “It is important that people continue to follow the guidelines on the distance, physical and social, but at the same time, I understand the psychology behind the fact of wanting to feel a little like normal. I think that was the goal for us,” he said.

In Winnipeg, Manitoba, le bar-glacier Bridge Drive-In has closed its drive-through service two days after its opening, because of the traffic jams that created friction with the neighborhood.

In Ontario, customers waited up to two hours for a box of donuts in Mississauga and gardening, considered as an outdoor activity without the risk, has inspired a rush of a new greenhouse in Barrie.

According to James Danckert, a professor of psychology at the University of Waterloo and a specialist in boredom, the long lines waiting for products, however non-essential can be born out of a desire to reconnect with his daily pre-pandemic.

Even if the wait is painful, people are willing to wait for the feeling of freedom that it provides them with after eight weeks of confinement, ” says Mr. Danckert. “Before all that, our daily routines had at least some variety”, he says.

A web application that is participatory has also seen the light of day to indicate the waiting time in the various shops.

Mark Kolb, Aurora, Ontario, has created Linesups.live after seeing a long queue in front of a Costco, at 7am in April. The application depends on the user input, which capture in real time the length of a queue, or the waiting period.

“It’s become viral in Toronto and across Canada,” says Mr. Kolb. If the queues are there for good, I’ll improve it.”

Note to readers : In the version passed on may 15 of this telegram, The canadian Press wrote, erroneously, that the name of the creator of Linesups.live called Mike Kolb. In fact, he is called Mark Kolb.

Le Soleil

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